MINDLESSNESS

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    My BFF sent me some food for thought this morning & I wanted to share.

     
    The article was in the latest issue of Taste of Home magazine:

     

    “If you always eat popcorn when you’re at the movies, you’re likely to gobble down the popcorn no matter how awful it tastes.  To prove this, scientists at the University of Southern California handed people entering a movie theater a bucket of either just-popped or week-old popcorn.  People who normally avoid movie popcorn ate much less stale than fresh popcorn.  But moviegoers who usually crunch away on the snack during movies ate the same amount of popcorn, regardless of whether it was fresh or stale.  According to the researchers, when you associate a certain food with a specific environment, you’ll eat and eat, no matter how awful it is.  For a happy ending, be sure to engage your taste-buds before mindlessly munching.”

     

    I usually take little stock in scientific experiements talked about in home magazines, but, the thing I most identify with, is this statement: “when you associate a certain food with a specific environment, you’ll eat and eat, no matter how awful it is.  For a happy ending, be sure to engage your taste-buds before mindlessly munching.”

     

    This is so true.  And, it reminded me of lesson 2 in Dr. A’s workbook companion guide, Living a Longer Healthier Life.  In it, he defines habits & discusses how we have the opportunity to change our habits if we truly want to.  From his book:

     

    “It looks something like this:

     

    Stimulus ———-> Action

    Saber-toothed Tiger ————–> Run

     

    It doesn’t take many intense experiences like these to engrain a response.

    Repetition can also create deeply rooted habits that are hard to change:

     

    Watching TV ——–> Hungry ———–> Bowl of Popcorn

     

    And soon enough:

     

    Watching TV ————> Bowl of Popcorn

     

    You may have just finished dinner when you sit down to watch TV with a bowl of popcorn, but the stimulus of hunger is no longer necessary.  A Habit of Disease has been born.”

     

    The best part is, this isn’t a doomsday scenario.  These habits we developed as children-most likely-can be undone or redone and turned into positive things.  We can make up new habits of health.  For instance:

     

    Wake up ———–> Workout

    Watching TV ————> Do ab exercises during the commercials

    Driving ————> Drink bottled water

     

    So start recognizing the habits of disease in your life, think of the foundational choices that support optimal health, and start implementing them in your daily life while subtracting the negative portions.  You can do it!

     

COMMENTS

1 Response to mindlessness

  • Tami Peterson wrote on February 1, 2012 at 7:26 // Reply

    This explains why when I hear Mexican music, I instantly want to eat chips and salsa!
    Every. Single. Time. :)
    Thanks for the insight!

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